Capital Pawn celebrates President’s Day on February 17th

President’s Day

Worry is the interest paid by those who borrow trouble. – George Washington, (1732-99)

Capital Pawn is closed in honor of our first president of the United States — February 17, 2014

If you’d like a list of the 15 days out of the year that we are closed (not including Sundays), check our calendar at CapPawn.com

George Washington

George Washington

The following is taken from http://www.almanac.com/content/when-presidents-day:

Both President’s Day and George Washington’s birthday are always celebrated on the third Monday of February.

The observed federal holiday is actually called George Washington’s Birthday. Certain states, however, list the holiday as Presidents’ Day.

George Washington’s Birthday

Although George Washington’s birthday is celebrated on February 22, it is observed as a federal holiday on the third Monday of February. To complicate matters, Washington was actually born on February 11 in 1731! How can that be? During Washington’s lifetime, people in Great Britain and America switched from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar (something most of Europe had done in 1582). As a result of this calendar reform, people born before 1752 were told to add 11 days to their birth dates. Those born between January 1 and March 25, as Washington was, also had to add one year to be in sync with the new calendar. By the time Washington became president in 1789, he celebrated his birthday on February 22 and listed his year of birth as 1732. Upon entering office, Washington was not convinced that he was the right man for the job. He wrote, “My movements to the chair of government will be accompanied by feelings not unlike those of a culprit, who is going to the place of his execution.” Fortunately for the young country, he was wrong. You can read more about Washington at the official White House website.

. . .

Year Presidents’ Day
2012 Monday, February 20
2013 Monday, February 18
2014 Monday, February 17
2015 Monday, February 16

Did You Know?

If you think that George Washington chopped down a cherry tree and then admitted his wrongdoing by saying to his father, “I can not tell a lie,” think again. He didn’t say it; he didn’t even chop down the tree! Parson Mason Weems (1759–1825), one of Washington’s biographers, made up the story, hoping to demonstrate Washington’s honesty.

This tale is not the only myth about Washington. His wooden dentures? They weren’t made of wood. Instead, they were made of hippopotamus teeth that had been filed down to fit Washington’s mouth.

http://www.almanac.com/content/when-presidents-day

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