Capital Pawn and Labor Day

We will be open regular hours on Tuesday, September 2. See you then!

We will be open regular hours on Tuesday, September 2.
See you then!

Capital Pawn

Capital Pawn is choosing to honor their employees this weekend because of Labor Day. On Saturday and Monday we will allow our employees time to spend with family and friends.

The following is an explanation of Labor Day according to the Department of Labor:

Labor Day: How it Came About; What it Means

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.

Founder of Labor Day

More than 100 years after the first Labor Day observance, there is still some doubt as to who first proposed the holiday for workers.

Some records show that Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, was first in suggesting a day to honor those “who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold.”

But Peter McGuire’s place in Labor Day history has not gone unchallenged. Many believe that Matthew Maguire, a machinist, not Peter McGuire, founded the holiday. Recent research seems to support the contention that Matthew Maguire, later the secretary of Local 344 of the International Association of Machinists in Paterson, N.J., proposed the holiday in 1882 while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York. What is clear is that the Central Labor Union adopted a Labor Day proposal and appointed a committee to plan a demonstration and picnic.

The First Labor Day

The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on September 5, 1883.

In 1884 the first Monday in September was selected as the holiday, as originally proposed, and the Central Labor Union urged similar organizations in other cities to follow the example of New York and celebrate a “workingmen’s holiday” on that date. The idea spread with the growth of labor organizations, and in 1885 Labor Day was celebrated in many industrial centers of the country.

Labor Day Legislation

Through the years the nation gave increasing emphasis to Labor Day. The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed during 1885 and 1886. From them developed the movement to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During the year four more states — Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York — created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 other states had adopted the holiday in honor of workers, and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.

A Nationwide Holiday

The form that the observance and celebration of Labor Day should take were outlined in the first proposal of the holiday — a street parade to exhibit to the public “the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations” of the community, followed by a festival for the recreation and amusement of the workers and their families. This became the pattern for the celebrations of Labor Day. Speeches by prominent men and women were introduced later, as more emphasis was placed upon the economic and civic significance of the holiday. Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement.

The character of the Labor Day celebration has undergone a change in recent years, especially in large industrial centers where mass displays and huge parades have proved a problem. This change, however, is more a shift in emphasis and medium of expression. Labor Day addresses by leading union officials, industrialists, educators, clerics and government officials are given wide coverage in newspapers, radio, and television.

The vital force of labor added materially to the highest standard of living and the greatest production the world has ever known and has brought us closer to the realization of our traditional ideals of economic and political democracy. It is appropriate, therefore, that the nation pay tribute on Labor Day to the creator of so much of the nation’s strength, freedom, and leadership — the American worker.

Capital Pawn celebrates President’s Day on February 17th

President’s Day

Worry is the interest paid by those who borrow trouble. – George Washington, (1732-99)

Capital Pawn is closed in honor of our first president of the United States — February 17, 2014

If you’d like a list of the 15 days out of the year that we are closed (not including Sundays), check our calendar at CapPawn.com

George Washington

George Washington

The following is taken from http://www.almanac.com/content/when-presidents-day:

Both President’s Day and George Washington’s birthday are always celebrated on the third Monday of February.

The observed federal holiday is actually called George Washington’s Birthday. Certain states, however, list the holiday as Presidents’ Day.

George Washington’s Birthday

Although George Washington’s birthday is celebrated on February 22, it is observed as a federal holiday on the third Monday of February. To complicate matters, Washington was actually born on February 11 in 1731! How can that be? During Washington’s lifetime, people in Great Britain and America switched from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar (something most of Europe had done in 1582). As a result of this calendar reform, people born before 1752 were told to add 11 days to their birth dates. Those born between January 1 and March 25, as Washington was, also had to add one year to be in sync with the new calendar. By the time Washington became president in 1789, he celebrated his birthday on February 22 and listed his year of birth as 1732. Upon entering office, Washington was not convinced that he was the right man for the job. He wrote, “My movements to the chair of government will be accompanied by feelings not unlike those of a culprit, who is going to the place of his execution.” Fortunately for the young country, he was wrong. You can read more about Washington at the official White House website.

. . .

Year Presidents’ Day
2012 Monday, February 20
2013 Monday, February 18
2014 Monday, February 17
2015 Monday, February 16

Did You Know?

If you think that George Washington chopped down a cherry tree and then admitted his wrongdoing by saying to his father, “I can not tell a lie,” think again. He didn’t say it; he didn’t even chop down the tree! Parson Mason Weems (1759–1825), one of Washington’s biographers, made up the story, hoping to demonstrate Washington’s honesty.

This tale is not the only myth about Washington. His wooden dentures? They weren’t made of wood. Instead, they were made of hippopotamus teeth that had been filed down to fit Washington’s mouth.

http://www.almanac.com/content/when-presidents-day

Martin Luther King, Jr, Day – Capital Pawn

Glimpses of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

In honor of Martin Luther King, JR, Day, Capital Pawn will be CLOSED

 

Monday January 20, 2014 is a Federal Holiday

Being closed will allow our Team Members to rest with their friends and family

We hope you are able to rest and enjoy a day free from work and a hectic schedule. Below you can find one history of how the day off became a holiday. Enjoy and Capital Pawn will be open for regular business hours on Tuesday, January 21. Of course, you can shop Capital Pawn 24/7 at our eBay and Amazon stores.

Normal Business Hours:

  • Monday-Friday: 10am-6pm
  • Saturday: 10am-5pm
  • Sunday: REST

 
 
 

The History of Martin Luther King Day

Who originated the idea of a national holiday in honor of MLK?

by Shmuel Ross and David Johnson
Read more:  Martin Luther King, Jr., Holiday | Infoplease.com http://www.infoplease.com/spot/mlkhistory1.html#ixzz2qgNDUHrX

It took 15 years to create the federal Martin Luther King, Jr., holiday. Congressman John Conyers, Democrat from Michigan, first introduced legislation for a commemorative holiday four days after King was assassinated in 1968. After the bill became stalled, petitions endorsing the holiday containing six million names were submitted to Congress.

Conyers and Rep. Shirley Chisholm, Democrat of New York, resubmitted King holiday legislation each subsequent legislative session. Public pressure for the holiday mounted during the 1982 and 1983 civil rights marches in Washington.

Congress passed the holiday legislation in 1983, which was then signed into law by President Ronald Reagan. A compromise moving the holiday from Jan. 15, King’s birthday, which was considered too close to Christmas and New Year’s, to the third Monday in January helped overcome opposition to the law.

National Consensus on the Holiday

A number of states resisted celebrating the holiday. Some opponents said King did not deserve his own holiday—contending that the entire civil rights movement rather than one individual, however instrumental, should be honored. Several southern states include celebrations for various Confederate generals on that day. Arizona voters approved the holiday in 1992 after a tourist boycott. In 1999, New Hampshire changed the name of Civil Rights Day to Martin Luther King, Jr., Day.
Read more:  Martin Luther King, Jr., Holiday | Infoplease.com http://www.infoplease.com/spot/mlkhistory1.html#ixzz2qgKYGf7L

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